Buyer beware

I’m doing just great with online dating. Last week, I met a guy who threw a temper tantrum when I didn’t answer his texts right away.

Yesterday, I caught a con artist.

This guy claimed to be in the Army, and said he was about to be deployed to a peacekeeping mission in Africa. (Really? Then how come this hasn’t been in the news?) 

I was already suspicious because he seemed to be getting serious about me pretty fast – without even having met me in person, and despite my telling him, “Let’s slow this down.”

He wanted me to “send him stuff he might need,” that he couldn’t get while there. (Um, no. The military gets its people what they really need. We’re not talking about someone back home sending a care package.)

What put me over the edge of suspicion was when he said he wanted to introduce me to “a diplomat” who would assist me in getting things to him.

I know for a fact that nobody needs to go through a “diplomat” in order to communicate with somebody who’s overseas with the U.S. military. If he was in something routine, there are ways to communicate with people deployed overseas (APO addresses, mail.mil email, etc.) And if he was in something that was deep and secret and complicated, he wouldn’t have told me about it at all. 

He had sent me some photos, so I used TinEye.com to search on them. And one of his photos turned up on a site called Scamwarners.com – he’s done this before.

I told the Scamwarners site that this guy is still trying it; and I reported him to the online dating site where I met him.

I screenshotted the stuff I’d found about him on Scamwarners.com and sent it to him – along with a link to the theme song from “Cops.”

Well, I thought it was funny. 

Joking aside, though – be careful out there. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

You can search on photos with TinEye.com and Google Image. Scamwarners.com is a good resource; and I’m sure there are more sites like that. And if you encounter a con artist on a dating site, report it to the site.

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